Look At Us, DVAA, Rosalind Bloom

Rosalind Bloom, White Faces, collage and text

Look At Us

Artworks by Da Vinci Art Alliance members:
– Rosalind Bloom: collage, transfer print and mixed media installation
– Sarah R. Bloom: photography and mixed media
– Colleen Gahrmann: ceramics, sculpture, mixed media and photographic installations
– Charlotte Schatz: drawings, prints and sculpture

Artist Reception: Sunday July 22nd, from 1-5pm, Artist Talks start at 2pm.

DVAA, the artist run gallery in South Philly, is hosting a group show by member artists exploring subject facts concerning painful, difficult, controversial social memes about race and discrimination. The collection of artwork addresses the theme with an experience design that is engaging, thought provoking, and beautiful; the gallery is arranged to create a flow between art forms, concepts, and compositions. A meme is a unit of cultural information that spreads like a virus from mind to mind; cultural ideas, biological and social anxieties, historic resonance, and deeply packed phycological concepts are transmitted with language, image, gesture and tone. Presenting an art exhibit with disturbing imagery challenges the artists to confront ideas with a plastic language of line, light, shape, and color; social practice connects the conceptual context to an inquiry through mark making, composition, and activity by the artist. Social Practice is an important art movement in the 21st Century, artists are addressing ideas that permeate society that feel too hard to look at, too big to wrap your head around, too ugly and mean that words are not enough to explain.

Artist Rosalind Bloom uses collage to process the unimaginably horrific actions of individuals with scraps, tears, and remnants of paper into bits of information, like tessera in a mosaic, depicting modern monsters and sociopaths as memetic subjects integrated into artwork. The randomness of found object and collage abstracts the visual and textual cues into deep empathic passages of consciousness; the edges of the idea integrated into all the other edges creating a network of concepts in a resonate, communicative unit of cultural information, a meme. Through color and texture, a pathway of thought pattern is coded into neural networks of experience, the dialog is enlivened with hue and tone, shapes overlap and merge into blobs of memory like pseudopodia, and units of information are embedded in mitochondria filaments of emotion and reaction.

 

Look At Us, DVAA

Sarah R. Bloom, photography, Colleen Gahrmann‘s installation

Within the structure of the meme is semiotics, words contain the codes to myth, memory, and self awareness; groupings of alphabetic symbols arranged in circles are informed with memetic patterns of the cultural penetration of the behavioral aberration of patriarchal entities on social fabric; myth is encoded to every fiber of information, each line expressive of experience, and illustrativeness embeds the word pictures into a coalescent narrative. The expressiveness of line and shape provides the superstructure of the concept, action and activity are the engine; line, shape, color, and light are the atomic center of communication.

Social Practice as a plastic tool in the artist’s palette is colored with nuance, liveness, immediacy, and viral transference of units of cultural information; the plane of communication vibrates with energies of a higher level, wave forms that ripple across generations, to be abstracted into objects of resonant fascination. Within the objects are found exquisite beauty, delicate and desirable, with a quality of values, disruptive to culture, engaging the community to communicate on a higher frequency.

Look At Us, DVAA

Charlotte Schatz, sculpture

LOOK AT US – an exhibition hosted @ DVAA in Gallery 1

704 Catherine Street, Philadelphia
July 6th – 29th

Artist Reception: Sunday July 22nd, from 1-5pm, Artist
Talks start at 2pm.

Artworks byDVAA members:
– Rosalind Bloom: collage, transfer print and mixed media installation
– Sarah R. Bloom: photography and mixed media
– Colleen Gahrmann: ceramics, sculpture, mixed media and photographic installations
– Charlotte Schatz: drawings, prints and sculpture

DVAA is proud to host Look at US, an exhibition of works by Rosalind Bloom, Sarah R. Bloom, Colleen Gahrmann, and Charlotte Schatz which critique American culture. This exhibition runs concurrently with the DVAA exhibition in Gallery 2, The City and The Sea.

LOOK AT US is an exhibition of work that addresses issues of contemporary American public concern, some of which are immensely and forwardly pervasive, others which are just as prevalent but often much more subtle. In sculpture, ceramics, mixed media collage, and photography, these artists acknowledge and examine their own privilege, thus opening a dialogue on issues such as gender inequality, social injustice, and the history of American racial tension. In the face of hatred and oppression we all need to own our own complicity.

DVAA thanks our 2018 exhibition sponsors DeFino Law Associates and Seed&Space!

by DoN Brewer

All photographs by Sarah R. Bloom.

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Keith SmithMargaret Gave me a Rainbow, 2:30pm 21 November, 1971, 1971, by Keith Smith, American, b. 1938. Collage of 3-M Color-in-Color photocopy transferred to buff-colored manila paper, gold star, multicolored thread, gelatin silver print, and rayon braid and tassels, hand and machine stitched to green plain weave cotton with gold rayon faille backing. Courtesy of Bruce Silverstein Gallery, New York. © Keith Smith.

Like a Rainbow

by DoN Brewer

I graduated from high school in 1971 and was awarded a $50. savings bond for being ‘the most artistic’ in my class. I cashed in the bond and bought LSD. I’ve always felt like an artist, I didn’t realize artist is another word for faggot. It wasn’t until 1973 that homosexuality was removed from the American Psychiatric Association list of mental disorders in the DSM-II Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. I’ve known I was attracted to men since I was a small child; fantasies of being around naked men began when I was about five years old. The Summer of Love in 1969 allowed me to begin to express myself as a hippie with long hair and wide bell bottoms; I remember my mom saying to me that I looked like a queer. I didn’t know what queer meant, I didn’t know how to deal with my feelings, I was harassed in the school hallways for the way I looked; my only solace was art class. When I was 16 we used to go to New York Avenue in Atlantic City, I had a fake ID and my best friend and I would spend all night at the gay bars that lined the street; I could be as effeminate as I felt without fear. I left home at 18 and in the Summer of 1973 I visited Provincetown on Cape Cod for the first time.

At the time P-Town, Fire Island and Key West were the only destinations where gay people could express themselves openly and show public displays of affection without fear of harassment, punishment, or condemnation. Frank Rizzo was Chief of Police in Philly and struck terror in the hearts of gay people; my fake ID got me entrance into some of the gay bars like Equis and the Allegro. Little did I know that the police had a squad of cops, who wore tight white jeans, that would hang out by the urinals and if they were cruised would arrest people. But the cops didn’t take them to jail, they took people down to the Schuylkill River, beat them up and tossed them in the river. Even worse if you got caught messing around in the bathroom at Strawbridge and Clothier your name would be published in the newspaper for all to see. The struggle was real. In Provincetown I was free to be me.

We would rent a small salt box house on the outskirts of town for $65. a week and ride our bikes to the shops, restaurants, galleries, and the beach. I loved the shops with the colorful, unique artifacts and I purchased my first rainbow objects – a stained glass rainbow and an embroidered rainbow patch. The stained glass still hangs in my window but it wasn’t until a few years ago I gained the nerve to sew the patch onto my jean jacket. When I saw Keith Smith‘s Margaret Gave me a Rainbow at The Philadelphia Museum of Art memories flooded my mind. I remembered marching down Walnut Street in the first gay pride parade in Philly, I remembered arguing with Rev. Carl McIntire on the radio because he thought the word ‘gay’ should be replaced with the word ‘sad’, I remembered my dad saying he didn’t care if I was gay as long as I didn’t take it up the ass, I remembered being told that I would be fired from J.M. Fields if I didn’t cut my hair, I remembered the beginning of AIDS and again living in fear for my life.

The rainbow flag was popularized as a symbol of the gay community by San Francisco artist Gilbert Baker in 1978.

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Renoir, Two Young Girls

Two Young Girls, Pierre-Auguste Renoir, oil on canvas, 32 1/4 x 25 13/16 inches, 1892, Philadelphia Museum of Art

Renoir Reconsidered: Plastic Analysis by DoN Brewer

Two Young Girls is a vertical oil painting composed of a matrix of radiating lines, curving structural segments, twisted, intertwining, interlocking shapes, multicolorful compartmentalized color, and shimmering, glowing light effects that suffuse the canvas with illumination, shadow, warmth and liveness. The subject facts include two girls seated outdoors in a sunny landscape, wearing fancy hats and stylish dresses, perched on spindly wooden garden chairs.

Line

The painting is composed of a complex set of orthogonal lines that emanate from the lower center section of the composition, three dark lines of seams on gloved hands, begin a radiating upward pattern of lines connecting the figures in a curvilinear, twisting, folding design that is intimate, unified, creating a continuum of plastic elements. The curving lines repeat with the top of the chair, the combined shoulders of the girls and the dramatic sweep of the hats. Like space invaders the girl’s hat on the left swoops under the right hat in the top third of the composition but the gloved hands of the girl on the right pokes her partner’s ribs in the bottom third.

Orthogonal lines radiate out like a fan or a parasol from the curved stripes of the gloves developing compartmentalized fields of shapes defined by color and light; the vanishing point is obscured by the figures, the atmosphere of sun drenched land and sky surrounds and permeates the duo, the landscape tilts up to a blurred horizon line visible on the left, a tree line meets the sky on the right.

Focusing on the gloved hand in the lower center, lines radiate outward connecting to the bottom of the canvas on both sides of the chair in the middle, towards the hand resting on the purple parasol on the left, diagonally through the shoulder along the cheek and past the hat to the upper left corner, a line to the face of the girl on the right, one through her shoulder letting the tree clump fill the right upper corner, lines reach across to the right lower edge of the canvas through the girl’s arms, and finally along the bunch of flowers in the lap of the girl on the right to the lower right of the picture.

We observe an interconnected radiating web of orthogonal lines, sweeping upward with curvilinear lines and a clever use of Mobius strips mixing the two elaborate hats infinitely, the enwrapping arms entwining the duo in volumetric space, and flowing, fluid, ray traced movement between the figures. The figure eight motif causes the eye to move through the composition, the hats become one unit, the figures swirl together, and even though the portrait of the girl on the right is so distinct and prominent, the infinity shape connecting the hats pushes the portrait forward; the hat on the left seems to be under the hat on the right, creating an illusory movement through curvilinear shapes and arabesque line.

Shape

Even though there are straight lines in the composition they describe circular objects like the chair spindles and the parasol; the stripes on the dress on the left are broken lines and undulate across the textile surface fluidly. The predominant shapes are rounded, voluminous, and connected across the composition developing circumambient space within a shallow depth of field; two young girls engaged in conversation, displaying poise and style, with us, the viewers, conveniently within eves-dropping distance. The fashionable hats perched on the girls’ heads dominate the top third of the painting, the Mobius strip effect of the two objects links the figures in an infinite looping motion with a whirling twist like a DNA strand. The creatively distorted blobby shapes on the hats read as flowers and feathers but are fluffy, wispy puffs of color painted thickly with feathery edges.

The variety of shapes and their connections across orthogonal planes develops an interlocking composition of round, square and triangular spaces: circles, ellipses, and mounds of the hats and heads at the top, textiles and the rounded shapes of shoulders, arms and upper torso fill the middle, a sandwich design, and rings, tubes, and semi-circles of rods, cuffs, and collars, the rectangles of chair backs and the panel of the dress on the left, and layer upon layer of interlocking triangles weaving up and down, in and out, from the lower center where the gloved hands clasp, unify the duo as one swirled object. The upturned cone of the torso on the left is echoed by the pointy shapes of the purple umbrella in the lower left corner, the gloved hands unfold triangles towards the right. The combination of geometric shapes, twisted enfolding tubes, radiating triangles, and circular forms, coalesce into a compelling volumetric composition that is structured and solid yet fluid, with up and down movement, back and forth zigzags, and forward and backward organization of shapes.

Color

Renoir applies color in a mode enhancing the illustrative qualities of the composition while delighting the viewer with dramatic decorativeness and social liveliness. The palette balances warm and cool colors like contrasting solemn burnt Venetian red with deep Prussian blue in a subdued low key with bright ivory, luscious pink, pale greens and yellows in an exuberant high key enhanced with bursts of ebullient colorful contrasting reds and greens and an unexpected flourish of purple creating an elegant balance of color equivalents.

Color is compartmentalized in solid forms then appears across the picture plane in subtly unifying swatches and patches. Arguably the blue hat is the most prominent color shape in the composition because of the darkness against the multicolorful landscape; the feathery puffs are piled high flowing over the brim in circles, ovals and ellipses in deep blue, the splotches of pale blues and grays reflecting sunlight smudge out over the edges and mix with the sky and landscape echoing the smooth cobalt blue sky smeared across the top of the canvas with wide strokes, and overlapping into the greens and yellows of the landscape.

The hat on the left is overflowing with floral shapes, half red floral shapes with green leaves, half ochre, cadmium yellow, and pale green, like a floral still life spilling out of the hat basket; the brushstrokes are multidirectional, a mixture of long and short, swirly and amorphous, coiled and smudged, like the rolling foliage of the landscape. The two hats are unified by the yellow brims, an infinite swirl, the Mobius strip, of yellow, earthy ochre, and pale orange glazed over lumpy white paint, highly textural and glinting, the broken lines describing the tactile grain of the straw weave of the millinery shiny in the sun, fluffy feathers absorbing light and brilliant flowers reflecting the sun rays.

Flesh painting is constrained to the portraits of the two young girls along with one girl’s hand and wrist smoothly painted in ivory, pink, with shadows of pale blue and violet; the girl on the right has glowing red cheeks and burning red ear, like the red flowers of her partner’s hat, the girl on the left, with barely there features, is painted with ivory, light pink, and pale purple, the hair transfuses into pale orange and blue, the dark shadow defining the upswept hair as blue as the stripe in her partner’s hat.

Renoir’s limited palette is utilized to astonishing effect: mixing lake red with white creates a lovely pearly pink for flesh and fabric, cadmium yellow color chorded with streaks of bluish gray is strong and wooden, and viridian green glows in the landscape and along edges of the textile with brilliant contrast and light. The textile painting of the pink dress is applied thickly with piles of paint layered in pale Naples yellow, carmine mixed with white, and dramatic strokes of bold pure red making the shadows of fabric folds ornate and vivid, revealing weave, weight, and texture along with the fancy pattern and flattering color. The darker dress on the right compartmentalizes cobalt and black against red oxide, with strokes of green, blue, purple and ochre painted smoothly, densely, and layered across the shapes in dapples, smudges, washes and daubs from all the colors of the artist’s palette – her dress isn’t so plain, after all.

Light

Renoir creates spatial depth and light through color; the cobalt blue sky is smudgy and scudded with washes of pure blue, smoky gray and pearly, opalescent white that transfuses into the blue streaks of a pale horizon, the foliage of the landscape greedily sucks in light and reflects it back with Viridian green, Indian yellow, and cobalt blue with fluffy pounces of the brush, while the textiles absorb and transmit light through structural color, convincing contrasts, and color modeling. Light is the constant in the composition pervading structural elements such as flesh, fabric, landscape and still life with deliberate and controlled mixtures of limited color choices with white and black, thickness and thinness of paint application, directionality of brush strokes, and gradations of color mixture from dark darks to light lights into an infinite variety of colorful light and shadow.

Look at the gloved hands; appearing to be leather with thick stitching, folding and wrapping around the hands and forearms with all the colors of the palette describing atmosphere and temperature with short multicolorful strokes of ochre, cobalt, reds, and yellows that merge into segmented shapes and a unified color field informing the entire composition. Lastly, the purple umbrella in the lower left, a mix of lake red and cobalt, black and white, whirled into a fabulous violet in strokes of thick paint in thin chorded striations; the handle of the parasol wraps the wrist and literally glows, the thick textural paint reflects the gallery lights, as if the sun is glinting off the silvery curve while the colors of the landscape and figures are reflected in primary shades of blue, red, and yellow.

Renoir, Two Young Girls

 

 

 

 

 

Click for large picture.

Final project for the Barnes – de Mazia Certificate in Art and Aesthetics, The Barnes Foundation

Thank you to my instructors, particularly William M. Perthes, for sharing their knowledge and letting me share what I know, too.

Written by DoN Brewer.

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Why Renoir? The Plastic Club

Pierre-Auguste Renoir. Landscape (Paysage), c. 1917. Oil on canvas, 10 7/8 x 16 in.

Why Renoir?

 

Why Renoir? A Conversation with William M. Perthes, Director of Adult Education Barnes-de Mazia Education and Outreach Program, The Barnes Foundation

When: Sunday, April 15th, 2018, 2:00 – 4:00pm

Where: The Plastic Club, 247 South Camac Street, Avenue of the Artists, Philadelphia, PA, 19107, 215-545-9324

What: There are many questions about The Barnes Foundation and the great collection of artwork at 20th Street and the Parkway; the focus of this conversation will be about Pierre-Auguste Renoir and his artwork. Renoir was a prolific French painter in the late 19th and early 20th century, creating more than 6000 paintings in his lifetime, the Barnes collection includes 181 paintings, more than any other art collection in the world.

In advance of the upcoming exhibition at The Barnes Foundation, Renoir: Father and Son / Painting and Cinema, May 6th through September 3rd, 2018, the Plastic Club presents the opportunity to learn about the Barnes-de Mazia Education program and the relevance of Renoir’s artwork in the art collection. William M. Perthes will present a 30+ minute lecture, with images, about the paintings by Pierre-Auguste Renoir and then open the floor to questions about the artist and his contributions to contemporary art.

Why are there so many Renoir paintings in the Barnes Foundation? Why are there so many paintings of rosy cheeked females? Why are there so many female nude paintings in the collection? Why are Renoir’s paintings considered treacle? Are there Renoir paintings in every room of the collection? Why does Philadelphia love to hate Renoir? Don’t hesitate to ask your burning questions about why you love or hate Renoir; feel free to confront concerns, objections, feelings, and interpretations with a scholar, expert, and educator on the artwork of Auguste Renoir in an open and engaging conversation in a friendly artist’s environment.

Who: Pierre-Auguste Renoir, commonly known as Auguste Renoir; February 25,1841 – December 3, 1919), was a French artist who was a leading painter in the development of the Impressionist style. As a celebrator of beauty and especially feminine sensuality, it has been said that “Renoir is the final representative of a tradition which runs directly from Rubens to Watteau.”

He was the father of actor Pierre Renoir (1885–1952), filmmaker Jean Renoir (1894–1979) and ceramic artist Claude Renoir (1901–1969). He was the grandfather of the filmmaker Claude Renoir (1913–1993), son of Pierre. – Wikipedia

William Perthes is director of adult education at the Barnes Foundation. He has taught courses at the Barnes as well as the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts and West Chester and Villanova Universities. His scholarship focuses on American modernism and the abstract expressionist painter Robert Motherwell. – The Barnes Foundation

Refreshments after the lecture.

Written by DoN Brewer.

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1430 Art Tour, Blasco de Grañén

Blasco de Grañén, Saint Catherine of Siena before Pope Gregory XI,

A Guided Tour of Philadelphia in the Year 1430

by DoN Brewer

Part three of A Guided Tour of Philadelphia in the Year 1430 stops at The Barnes Foundation at 20th and the Parkway, Blasco de Grañén, Saint Catherine of Siena before Pope Gregory XI, 1422–1459. Tempera with gold leaf on panel, Overall: 34 x 23 1/2 inches.

Blasco de Grañén, known as Master of Lanaja, a Gothic painter in Aragon, an autonomous community of Spain, bordering the North of France, became the named painter of King Juan II of Aragon. “Juan II of Aragon, the Great or Juan without Faith ( Medina del Campo , Castilla , June 29, 1398 – Barcelona , January 20 , 1479 ) was Duke of Peñafiel , King of Navarre ( 1425 – 1479 ), King of Sicily ( 1458 – 1468 ) and King of Aragon , of Mallorca , of Valencia , of Sardinia ( 1458 – 1479 ), son of Fernando I of Antequera and of Leonor de Alburquerque , countess of Alburquerque. Juan II was one of the longest-living monarchs of the fifteenth century.” – Wikipedia

That is royalty! And what do royals want? The best of everything. Blasco de Grañén does his best to please the king by using available technology, gold and tempera paint, to depict qualities of life that appeal the the wealthy and powerful through art. Being able to communicate through plastic means is essential, the use of line, light, color and shape to portray consistency of the surface, the tactile qualities, the weightiness and gravity of environmental space.

The vertical painting contains many of the same subject facts we observed in the Robert Campin and Jan van Eyck paintings: religious piety, elaborate lifestyle, superior textiles and fashion, powerful architectural forms, and portraits. Painted on gold with tempera paint, pigments mixed with fast drying egg yolk, the overall palette is earthy, warm and somber, burnt sienna, umber, greenish umber, and ochre, the surface is smooth with striations of color compartmentalized into complex interconnecting shapes. The Spanish tradition of a heaviness to the color, a flat dryness, and with, like the Flemish, an elaborate attention to detail in textile. The frontal facing figures are stiff but the fabric flows, the variety of textiles from velvet to brocade is prolific.

Compare the figure of Saint Catherine, painted in the Spanish tradition, to the image of the Virgin by Robert Campin, a Netherlandish painter, in the painting Christ and the Virgin. Textile is the major mass of the figure, the pose is static and a primitiveness to the figure, the Byzantine quality to the depiction of folds is inactive, with tricky details over-patterning the surface. The lower third of the figure is dedicated to lovely, flowing, draped flash folds (the tempera is scraped off in striated lines to reveal the gold highlights) and swishy flows, layers of fabric are depicted in  dazzling detail. The same soft patterning is repeated in the halo surrounding the portrait, with it’s “hieratic” features, with the glints of gold shining through the flatness of the paint. In the Robert Campin painting the fabric is much more luminous and nuanced, more softness, drape and structure of the fabric is apparent.

Flatness extends to the perspective of the composition, there is no circumambient space, the attempt at movement in the depiction of textiles fails compared to the Flemish, even though the flesh is painted in delicate shades of pink there is no sense of naturalness. The composition is distorted, the landscape flat and stacked, with no clear vanishing point and the intersecting shapes are off balance. The use of paint to render textiles, folds, and texture is extremely important in the picture just as it is the paintings by Robert Campin and Jan van Eyck; the traditions of depicting fabric in clothing changes drastically from flat and arid tempera paint in the Spanish to the naturalistic, ambient and atmospheric quality that oil paint creates.

This ends our art tour of the year 1430 on the Parkway in Philly, I hope you enjoyed the conceit and were able to imagine the techtonic shift in art making from the Late Middle Ages into the Renaissance by the wide acceptance of the use of oil painting that spread throughout the art guilds of Europe. The tradition that became the academies and universities, art schools, studios, and economics of art begins at this time; analyzing paintings from the same time period reveals the power of visual communication through plastic means. I don’t think it’s an exaggeration to compare the change in communication through the arts in an enhanced, technological shift in materiality and the ability to describe ambience and reality as it is to accessing data through media today.

To explore more of the 15th Century watch for my post Party Like It’s 1430, coming soon on DoNArTNeWs.

Link to A Guided Tour of Philadelphia in the Year 1430

Link to Robert Campin, Christ and the Virgin

Link to Jan van Eyck art tobur blog post – click here.

Link to Party Like it’s 1430 blog post – click here

Written by DoN Brewer.

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Jan van Eyck

December 18, 2017

Jan van Eyck, Saint Francis of Assisi Receiving the Stigmata,1430‑1432 A Guided Tour of Philadelphia in 1430 by DoN Brewer The second stop on our art tour of Philly in the Late Middle Ages is also at The Philadelphia Museum of Art, Jan van Eyck, Saint Francis of Assisi Receiving the Stigmata,1430‑1432. The Old Masters Now exhibition at […]

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Robert Campin

December 16, 2017

Robert Campin, Christ and the Virgin, c. 1430‑1435 A Guided Tour of Philadelphia in the Year 1430 The first stop on our tour of artwork from 1430 is Robert Campin, Christ and the Virgin, c. 1430‑1435 at The Philadelphia Museum of Art, the Old Masters Now selections from the Johnson Collection. Link to A Guided Tour of Philadelphia in the Year 1430. […]

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1430

December 16, 2017

Christ and the Virgin, c. 1430‑1435. Robert Campin, also called the Master of Flémalle, Netherlandish (active Tournai). Oil and gold on panel, 11 1/4 x 17 15/16 inches. Philadelphia Museum of Art, John G. Johnson Collection, 1917. A Guided Tour of Philadelphia in the Year 1430 by DoN Brewer Of course, Philadelphia didn’t exist in […]

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Byzantine

November 22, 2017

Hugh Mesibov, Byzantine Figure, The Barnes Foundation https://collection.barnesfoundation.org/objects/6896/details Hugh Mesibov (American, born 1916) Byzantine Figure, 1945-1946, oil pastel over black ink on cardstock mounted to multi-ply paperboard (14 x 11 in.) The Barnes Foundation (Gallery 22, east wall) Since September I have been studying The Traditions of Art at The Barnes Foundation with the senior […]

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Garrity

August 31, 2017

Bruce Garrity, Recent Work A large painting, 70″ x 58″, oil on canvas, this artwork was displayed along two similar sized paintings at 3rd Street Gallery as part of Bruce Garrity‘s presentation of his recent paintings this past June. The horizontal composition is constructed of high key, lush, complementary swaths of color, climbing, sinuous fields of marks, patches, […]

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